About Us

The Asian American Students' Association (AASA) serves the Asian Pacific Islander (API) community at Stanford through education, organization, service, and action. Formed over 40 years ago, AASA continues to actively promote conciousness of API cultures, identities, and issues.

In addition to being an independent organization, AASA is also the coordinating umbrella organization for over 30 other officially or unofficially affiliated Asian Pacific American groups on campus and is dedicated to fostering open communication and cooperation among these different groups.

Furthermore AASA supports the ongoing API struggle for justice and equality, affirming the importance of interethnic/interracial diversity while standing in solidarity with all communities of color and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer movement.

AASA sponsors several major events each year, including an Asian American issues conference, "Listen to the Silence," and API heritage events during the month of May, and other events throughout the year.

AASA also belongs to the Students of Color Coalition (SOCC), which is composed of the leadership of five umbrella organizations on campus representing students of color: the Asian American Students' Association (AASA), Black Student Union (BSU), Movimento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MEChA) de Stanford, Muslim Student Awareness Network (MSAN), and the Stanford American Indian Organization (SAIO). Over the years, the Students of Color Coalition (SOCC) has been able to successfully advocate on behalf of individual candidates running for campus leadership positions and campus advocacy issues important to Stanford's communities of color. These issues, unlike vague promises of campus betterment, are based on the principles at the heart of the SOCC doctrine: social justice, equal opportunity, and tolerance.

Constitution of the Asian American Students' Association

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Name of the organization

Asian American Students' Association (AASA)

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of AASA is threefold:

  1. To promote friendship among members of the Stanford community.
  2. To promote awareness of Asian American identity and heritage.
  3. To advocate support of Asian American activities and general welfare by Stanford University and other institutions.

AASA fulfills these purposes by:

Developing and implementing a well-balanced program of projects, activities, and events. AASA sponsors dances, workshops, classes, speakers, films, publications, and other projects.

Serving as a resource for individuals and other organizations: AASA supports individuals by counseling and providing education materials and referrals. AASA supports Asian American and other ethnic organizations by fundraising, publicizing, endorsing, and cosponsoring events.

Keeping abreast of the various and changing needs of the Asian American student community through surveys, newsletters, and open meetings. AASA encourages participation by students of all backgrounds. The Asian American identity is not defined or limited by the words Asian and American, but rather signifies the common experience of people from all Asian backgrounds in the U.S.

Eligibility for Membership

Membership

Membership in AASA is open and limited to the Stanford undergraduate community.

An active member is one who has attended AASA general meetings or functions or is considered an active member of another Asian American organization at Stanford such as those subgroups governed under AASA.

General Meetings

A general meeting is one to which all members of AASA have been publicly invited.
Fifty percent of the active membership constitutes a quorum.
The chairperson, or otherwise designated person, shall run the meeting.
Minutes of all general meetings shall be made available before the next general meeting.
A simple majority makes a decision. A tie leaves the question unresolved. Absentee voting will not be permitted unless through special prior provisions have been made.

Membership Involvement

For the purpose of broadening and encouraging membership involvement and for streamlining of day to day operations. AASA shall maintain several committees as described below:

Officers Core: the executive branch of AASA.

Short-term committees shall be formed to oversee the implementation of specific activities or events which have been discussed and given a vote of approval at a general meeting.

An overall plan of action is created by core officers and is implemented by all involved AASA members.

Officers

Titles and Responsibilities

As of 2011, and ratified by a 3/5 majority at AASA elections, the core structure has changed. There will be two co-chairs, one financial officer, one webmaster and a general title-less core, with shared responsibilities,

  1. Co-Chairs (2)
    • Leadership and organizational experience
    • Ability to manage time effectively, motivate and work well with people, and include many differing opinions in the decision process
    • Knowledge of the issues facing the Asian American community
    • Experience with the Asian American community
    • Must have been involved in AASA Core for at least one year before running for the Co-Chair position
      • At the discretion of current core, if core feels that there is not enough interest in this position, candidacy will open up to any Stanford student interested.
      • If the above occurs, at least one co-chair position will be given priority to a student with at least one year of AASA Core experience.
      • If no candidate has had AASA Core experience, both positions will be open to candidacy for all Stanford students interested.
  2. LTS Co-Chair (1)
    • Work together professionally to plan, organize, and run the annual Listen to the Silence conference
    • Create a timeline of tasks
    • Create a list, contact, and secure (a) keynote speaker(s).
    • Recruit, select, and work with committee leaders to plan and run LTS
    • Work with AASA's Financial Officer to organize funding for the conference
    • Work with LTS staff to brainstorm a theme for the conference.
  3. Webmaster (1)
    • Keep website (aasa.stanford.edu) updated throughout the year
    • Set up online registration for Listen to the Silence conference (fall/winter)
    • Leadership and organizational experience
    • Manage all social media aspects of AASA including Twitter and Facebook
    • Manage the aasastanford@gmail.com account including keeping digital records of AASA related materials
  4. Financial Officer (1)
    • Maintain and balance AASA's financial budget
    • Plan and submit an annual special fee request to the ASSU
    • Communicate with the treasurers of the other Asian American organizations to coordinate co-sponsorship of events
    • Create financial records and summaries of events
    • Coordinate fundraising events
    • Must have demonstrated knowledge of budgeting and the Special Fees process (i.e. a member of AASA core or the FO/co-chair for a subgroup)
  5. Core (7)
    • Duties and individual responsibilities will be decided by general agreement at core meetings
    • AASA core duties will be shared among the core, co-chairs, and freshman interns:
    • Coordinate subgroup representative system and publicity
    • Be liaison between students, graduate students and alumni
    • Assist the chairs in overseeing the organization and activities
    • Cultural/Education Responsibilities
      • Educate and foster appreciation of the diversity of Asian American culture(s)
      • Establish outreach programs appealing to non-Asian Americans and Asian American students not involved with AASA in order to inform, create interest, and harbor understanding of AASA's goals, activities, and purpose, as well as increasing awareness of Asian American issues in general
    • Issues and Political Responsibilities
      • Coordinate meetings to discuss and articulate the concerns of the Asian American community
      • Educate the rest of AASA, the Asian American community, and the general Stanford community
      • Gain support for campaigns that AASA initiates
    • Social/Community Responsibilities
      • Provide a social atmosphere for members to meet and get to know each other. Should be creative in order to think of original events and should be responsible and energetic in order to carry out the ideas.
      • Encourage development of community and ensure connectedness of AASA subgroups.
    • Community Service Responsibilities
      • Involve AASA members in community service projects to meet the needs of the Bay Area Asian American community
      • Institutionalize community service through the Public Service Center and the A3C
    • General Core expectations
      • Secretarial duties will shift weekly, with each week's secretary chosen at the beginning of each meeting. The secretary will be responsible for taking notes and then creating the agenda for the following meeting
      • Guidelines for community involvement and agreements for attendance at community events will be determined as deemed necessary throughout the year by agreement among the core
  6. Freshman Interns (max 10)
    • The number of Freshman shall be in the minority of overall core
    • The purpose of freshman interns (frosh interns) is to develop future leadership, connect new students to the Asian American community, and to provide a platform for reaching out to freshmen.
    • Frosh Interns will be chosen by the existing core through an application and interview process whose structure will be chosen by the existing core.
    • Frosh Interns are to be considered full core members, with all the rights are responsibilities that title entails.
    • Frosh Interns will be given an upperclassman liaison to assist in planning events and to advise.
    • Frosh Interns will be expected to complete Frosh Intern projects, such as Freshmen mixers with the API community and AASA subgroups, the frequency of which will be agreed upon during the beginning of each quarter.

Elections and Removal Process

  • Elections shall be held once each academic year, no later than the 6th week of spring quarter to allow for adequate transition time.
  • AASA Core members who are selected to be elections commissioners (2-3) will run elections. Their duties include, sending out the call for nominations, receiving those nominations, setting up the time/date/location of elections, and creating the publicity for these items. Elections commissioners will count the ballots and will not be permitted to vote in this election, unless a tie situation occurs. In addition to this, Elections commissioners will not be eligible to run for a position on Core. Elections commissioners will have final say in anything elections related that is not addressed in this constitution.
  • A mandatory core transition retreat must happen no later than week 9 of spring quarter, where all former core and core elect must attend.
  • Elections are open to all registered Stanford students who have met the following criteria:
    • Voted yes on AASA Special Fees
    • Present on the AASA mailing list
    • Present for the entire elections process
    • Must have attended an AASA event during the academic year
  • All group leaders must be registered students
  • Election information will be distributed before the elections allowing people interested to submit a brief statement introducing her/himself, reasons for running and goals for the next year.
  • Should there not be enough interest in any of the Core positions, the positions will be left empty until one of the following occurs:
    • First: The new Co-Chair(s) appoint a person
    • Second: If the First does not or cannot happen: new core will determine how to select the new person, whether it be a special election or core vote.
  • Elections will be held by written vote and require a majority
  • In the event of the resignation or inability of one Co-Chair to perform his/her responsibilities as Chair, AASA will use the following procedure:
    1. The other Chair will assume the responsibilities and title of Chair with the option of appointing another Co-Chair with a 3/5 vote of approval by the AASA general body.
    2. In the event that a 3/5 vote is not approved, then the sitting Chair will assume all responsibilities of the Chair position, until a 3/5 approval of an appointee is confirmed.

Length of Terms

Officer will serve for one academic year, barring any exceptional circumstances. The transition period will be one month following elections. The official transition between cores will happen no later than week 9 of Spring quarter.

Dissolution of Organization

Disposition of Uncommitted Funds

In the event of AASA's dissolution, all of AASA's uncommitted funds shall be transferred to the Asian American Activities Center (A3C) to be used and disbursed at the discretion of the Asian American Advisory Board.

Disposition of Property

In the event of AASA's dissolution, all of AASA's property shall be given to the A3C

Procedure to Amend Constitution

Amendments to this constitution require a 3/5 vote of approval by core members and general members at core meeting.
Ratification of this constitution requires a 3/5 vote of approval by AASA affiliates.

AASA Subgroups

AASA currently serves as the umbrella organization for 17 official subgroups. To learn more about a subgroup, click the link to its page.

AATP

Asian American Theatre Project

HKSA

Hong Kong Student Association

HSU

Hmong Student Union

JSU

Japanese Student Union


KSA

Korean Students Association

Newtype

Stanford Newtype Anime

Q&A

Queer and Asian

SAAAC

Stanford Asian American Activism Committee

Sanskriti

Stanford's South Asian Undergraduate Student Organization

S@S

Singaporeans at Stanford


SCD

Stanford Chinese Dance

SFoT

Stanford Friends of Tibet

SKA

Stanford Khmer Association

SVSA

Stanford Vietnamese Students' Association

TCS

Taiwanese Cultural Society


TSA

Thai Student Association

UCAA

Undergraduate Chinese American Association


AATP

Asian American Theatre Project

Steeped in history and rich in tradition, the AATP boasts its famous founders David Henry Hwang and Nancy Takahashi. Established in 1978, AATP strives to feature Asian Americans in positive, non-stereotypical roles and encourage Asian American talent in the arts. We hope to continue to build on our fine tradition of Asian American drama by providing opportunities to act, direct, write, and design. We welcome those interested in drama and theater to join us in our portrayals of the different stories which compose the Asian American experience.

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HKSA

Hong Kong Student Association

Founded in 1988, the Hong-Kong Student Association is a volunteer student organization of Stanford University dedicated to serve the Hong Kong community at Stanford and to serve those interested in Hong Kong culture.

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HSU

Hmong Student Union

The Stanford Hmong Student Union was founded in October 2007 by undergraduates interested in building a supportive community for Hmong students contemplating or currently attending Stanford; networking and collaborating with other Hmong groups and organizations; promoting awareness of Hmong ethnic identity at Stanford; and educating the greater campus and community about Hmong culture, history, issues and contemporaneous experiences in the United States.

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KSA

Korean Students Association

Formerly the Korean American Students Association (KASA), KSA has traditionally functioned as a social, cultural, political, and community service organization, and has provided the voice for the Korean American community here on campus. Throughout the year, the officer core and members--working together--plan a wide range of events and activities open to the entire campus. We extend a warm welcome to all of you and an invitation to become an active part of the Korean American community here at Stanford.

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Newtype

Stanford Newtype Anime

Newtype is Stanford University's anime club started by Hao Anh Le in 1992. He left for Japan during the 1995-1996 academic year, and Eric Tsai took over for the duration. But by 1997, Newtype had fallen apart and Stanford Otakus were forced underground... Then, in 1998, Tipatat resurrected Newtype and proclaimed that Otakus at Stanford would no longer have to lurk in the shadows and that Anime and Otaku culture would once and forever more have a voice at Stanford University. This is the rebirth of Stanford Newtype, a group whose purpose is to not only provide the Stanford Community with the finest selection of original language and English subtitled Japanese Animation, but to also promote awareness of anime culture. Otakus at Stanford Unite!

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Q&A

Queer/Questioning Asian/Pacific Islanders

Queer & Asian (Q&A) aims to build a supportive network amongst members of the Stanford community who are interested in exploring queer and Asian identities and issues. Q&A provides a safe space for its members to socialize with others, talk about their lives and common problems, and learn more about issues that are important to them. Founded in the late 80s to early 90s, Q&A had much of the same goals as it does now. It hopes to establish a strong sense of community amongst its members through mutual repsect social interaction, and a collective awareness of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQQ) issues pertinent to Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs).

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SAAAC

Stanford Asian American Activism Committee

SAAAC is a revolutionary collective of Asian American organizers and activists dedicated to the global struggle for equality, justice, and liberation for all oppressed peoples. As Asian Americans, we stand in solidarity with all people of color and oppose all imperialist wars of aggression, at home and abroad.

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Sanskriti

Stanford's South Asian Undergraduate Student Organization

Founded in 1989, Sanskriti has expanded quickly to become one of the largest cultural groups at Stanford. With over 500 members, Sanskriti functions as a portal that connects the Stanford community to South Asian culture. By exploring history and tradition, addressing issues of sociopolitical importance, presenting a social forum for our members, and promoting our performances and lively arts to the rest of the Stanford community, Sanskiti seeks to strengthen student awareness of South Asian culture.

Visit their website

S@S

Singaporeans at Stanford

Singaporeans@Stanford promotes awareness about Singaporean issues and culture on campus. In addition, we provide opportunities for the Singaporean community at Stanford to get together and chill. Our members range from born and bred Singaporeans with scarlet red passports, to people with ties to Singapore, to those simply curious about Singapore politics or Singlish or yummylicious Singaporean food. We warmly welcome you to join us at an event and find out more about the Little Red Dot!

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SCD

Stanford Chinese Dance

Founded in 2006, Stanford Chinese Dance provides students of all backgrounds the opportunity to experience Chinese dance and culture. We perform a variety of classical and contemporary Chinese dances from the Han ethnic majority and from the minority groups in China. Through our performances, we aim to encourage artistic expression and cultural understanding. We welcome all students interested in learning Chinese dance or culture - no previous dance experience necessary!

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SFoT

Stanford Friends of Tibet

Stanford Friends of Tibet is a student organization here at Stanford University with the primary goals of promoting Tibetan culture and raising awareness about the political situation inside Tibet. Through hosting different events throughout the year while participating in other Stanford events, we hope to bring the Tibetan culture into our diverse Stanford community and educate community members about the political situation in Tibet.

SKA

Stanford Khmer Association

SKA, formerly the Stanford Cambodian Cultural Association, seeks to promote awareness of Khmer culture through community events, culture and film nights, and other sponsored events. The club is open to all members of the Stanford undergraduate community regardless of ethnicity, and features a diverse membership.

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JSU

Japanese Student Union

JSU is an organization for anyone interested in Japanese and Japanese American cultures, and issues relating to Japanese and Japanese Americans both on campus and in the larger community. As both a social and volunteer oreinted organization, JSU attempts to participate in recreational activities within the group and with other groups on campus, while at the same time remaining involved in the community outside of Stanford. JSU's past activities have included organizing the 1993 Japanese American Reunion event, volunteering at the Cherry Blossom Festival in San Francisco, and participating in the Day of Remembrance event in San Jose.

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SVSA

Stanford Vietnamese Students' Association

Formed in the spring of 1988, SVSA has served as an on-campus family for all of its members, providing a support network and opportunities to increase ethnic and cultural awareness. The members of SVSA are truly diverse. Yet, we share a warmth, friendship, and closeness that makes belonging to SVSA a truly special experience. As a club, we participate in many campus activities and take an active part in the cultural, social and political life of the Vietnamese community in Northern California. SVSA looks forward to providing Vietnamese American students at Stanford with a chance to learn and grow in a warm, supportive environment.

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TCS

Taiwanese Cultural Society

TCS is a dedicated group of Stanford students who promote the awareness and preservation of Taiwanese culture. The unique history of Taiwan lends to a dynamic identity. We seel to explore issues related to the island and ourselves - who are mostly 2nd generation Taiwanese-Americans.

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TSA

Thai Student Association

Sawaddee from the Thai Student Association! We are a young group run by Thai and Thai-American students who are excited to share with you the intricate qualities of Thai culture, history, religion, language, and of course, Thai food! We invite all who are interested to come and experience the unique taste of Thailand through our weekly banquet gatherings, frequent excursions to nearby Thai wats (Temples) and other Thai cultural centers, as well as our customary cuisine.

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UCAA

Undergraduate Chinese American Association

UCAA emerged in 1988 as a cradle for Chinese culture and a social forum for the Stanford community. Cultural demonstrations complement annual cultural events such as the trip to the San Francisco Chinese New Year Parade, Culture Night, and Dim Sum outings. Popular social events in the past have included the ski trip and excursions to the beach. So join us, meet new people, and become part of the dynamic Asian American community at Stanford.

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